Yorkshire Pudding - Cheers Season 6 Episode 7.

YORKSHIRE PUDDING
THE LONGEST LIST OF THE LONGEST STUFF AT THE LONGEST DOMAIN NAME AT LONG LAST

Season 6 Episode 7: The Last Angry Mailman
Airdate:
December 12, 1987


This one is a double whammy.

The first quote is Esther Clavin explaining the origin of Yorkshire Pudding to Cliff during dinner.

In the second quote Cliff passes this knowledge on to the gang at Cheers.



Esther:

Yorkshire Pudding was invented in the late 1770's during a beef shortage. A person could be given a little bit of beef and soak up the gravy with the pudding thereby fooling his stomach into thinking he was having a fuller dinner than he actually was.
(Cliff: "And you wonder why nobody asks us out anymore.")



Cliff, later at Cheers:

Interestingly enough, Yorkshire Pudding was invented in the late 1700's during a beef shortage.

The truth:

Originally Yorkshire pudding was used as a first course for poor people who could not afford much meat.

If there wasn't enough meat the children would get the gravy and Yorkshire pudding to eat it with.

Eventually It became very popular with tourists in search of traditional English fare and ranks along with fish and chips as an internationally known item of English cuisine.

Now get cooking:

Yorkshire Pudding

3/4 c. flour 1/2 tsp. salt
2 eggs
1 c. milk
4 tbsp. oil


Beat flour, salt, eggs, milk together until very smooth, scraping bowl occasionally. Refrigerate 2 hours or longer. Heat oven to 450 degrees. Measure oil into 8 x 8 x 2 inch square Pyrex pan. Heat for 2 minutes. Pour batter into pan and bake for 20-30 minutes. Do not open door. Serve immediately.
When fresh from oven good Yorkshire pudding is a puffy irregular shaped golden mass, unlike any other baked dish. On standing a few minutes, the surface settles more or less evenly and when cut the outer crust is tender, crisp and center soft and custardy.


Serves 6.


Yorkshire Pudding - Cheers Season 6 Episode 7.

 Yorkshire Pudding - Cheers Season 6 Episode 7.

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