The first supersonic flight ever


WORLD'S FIRST SUPERSONIC FLIGHT
THE LONGEST LIST OF THE LONGEST STUFF AT THE LONGEST DOMAIN NAME AT LONG LAST

When was the world's first supersonic flight?

A supersonic flight needs to break the sound barrier which can vary.

  • At sea level it's 761 mph.

  • At 20,000 meters it's 660 mph.

  • At 29,000 meters it's 673 mph (altitude of Yeager's flight).

Officially Charles "Chuck" Yeager broke the sound barrier and made the world's first supersonic flight on October 14 1947 in the Bell X-1, aircraft #46-062, which he named 'Glamorous Glennis' after his wife.

Due to disputes he is credited with with being the first person to break the sound barrier in level flight.

On April 9 1945 a German pilot named Hans Guido Mutke claimed to break the sound barrier, but that claim is disputed.

Even though ordered not to break the sound barrier before the X-1, on October 01 1947 George Schwartz "Wheaties" Welch took a F-86 Sabre into a dive from 35,000 feet and some people claimed to have heard a sonic boom.

On October 14 1947, just a 1/2 hour before Yeager's flight, Welch once again went into a dive, this time from 37,000 feet and an even louder sonic boom was heard.

Due to the inaccuracy of the equipment used the claims that George  Welch was the first to reach supersonic speeds is highly disputed and not recognized.


The Bell X-1 'Glamorous Glennis'


The first supersonic flight ever

The first supersonic flight ever

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