The first daylight saving time ever


WORLD'S FIRST DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME
THE LONGEST LIST OF THE LONGEST STUFF AT THE LONGEST DOMAIN NAME AT LONG LAST

When was the world's first daylight saving time?

Daylight saving time, DST, or most commonly known as daylight savings time was first implemented  by the German government during the WWI on April 30 1916 and lasted until October 1 1916.

On May 21 1916 the United Kingdom followed suit.

It is a common belief that Benjamin Franklin came up with the idea in 1784 in a letter to the Journal of Paris, but all he was suggesting was that people go to bed earlier and wake up earlier. An excerpt from the letter shows his logic:

In the six months between the 20th of March and the 20th of September, there are

  • Nights 183

  • Hours of each night in which we burn candles 7

  • Multiplication gives for the total number of hours 1,281

  • These 1,281 hours multiplied by 100,000, the number of inhabitants, give 128,100,000

  • One hundred twenty-eight millions and one hundred thousand hours, spent at Paris by candle-light, which, at half a pound of wax and tallow per hour, gives the weight of 64,050,000

  • Sixty-four millions and fifty thousand of pounds, which, estimating the whole at-the medium price of thirty sols the pound, makes the sum of ninety-six millions and seventy-five thousand livres tournois 96,075,000

You can read the full letter here.

The first true proposal of daylight saving time was made by by William Willett in the 'Waste of Daylight' in 1907 but the British government never adopted the idea.

Confused about the whole mess? Just remember the rule of thumb: spring ahead and fall back.


The first daylight saving time ever

The first daylight saving time ever

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