The first Railroad in the U.S. ever


FIRST RAILROAD IN THE U.S.
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What was the first railroad in the U.S.?

Using trains is one of the safest and most convenient ways to travel today. And even though today trains have evolved into luxury modes of transportation, offering everything from meals to WiFi on the different cars, they were once used just for transportation, and although considered very modern for their time, were not the grand luxuries that we see today. But when you’re talking about the first railroad ever in the U.S. was, the answer may be somewhat debatable.

The first railroad ever actually built in the United States was the Granite Railroad in Quincy, Massachusetts. Although this was technically the first railroad ever built in the U.S., it never actually ran. The tracks apparently were not strong enough to support the weight of the train.

There was another famous railroad built in 1810 by a man named Thomas Leiper. This railroad connected Crum Creek to Ridley Creek in Pennsylvania. In 1862 the first railroad would be designed that would connect the West Coast with the Midwest and was actually constructed from two sets of tracks. One set of tracks was called the Union Pacific Railroad and it traveled west from Nebraska. The other tracks were called the Central Pacific Railroad and they traveled east from the Pacific Ocean. The sets of tracks met up together in Promontory Summit in Utah. Even though this was certainly not the first railroad, it was the first system that allowed travelers to get across the country in much shorter time, and much more conveniently, than they had before.


The Granite Railroad


The first Railroad in the U.S. ever

The first Railroad in the U.S. ever