The McRaven House

THE McRAVEN HOUSE
THE LONGEST LIST OF THE LONGEST STUFF AT THE LONGEST DOMAIN NAME AT LONG LAST

The story of the McRaven House.

The Civil War turned many common day structures and war buildings into what are now spirit and ghostly-filled structures. The case is no different in Vicksburg, Mississippi. It was here that General Ulysses Grant knew that he must take control of the river, and the city, so that opposing troops could not simply send supplies and food up and down the river at will. Grant was successful in his attempt to take control of Vicksburg and on July 4, 1863, Grant took over the city.

Amongst Grant’s army was a man by the name of Colonel Wilson who had an assistant, Captain McPherson. Deciding where they should convene, they decided on a home located at 1445 Harrison Street. Wilson and McPherson lived at the home for some time. Colonel Wilson was from Vicksburg initially and he wanted to not only stay to see it through hard times, but he also wanted to see that, as he so often stated, “the next generation doesn’t end up hating us like the last one did.” Many months passed until one day, Captain McPherson went missing. Colonel Wilson was in such angst over his friend that he conducted his own search party to try and locate him.

One night, Colonel Wilson fell asleep in his rocking chair. He woke up when he heard a noise in his bedroom but fell back asleep when he woke up to see there was nothing there. He was awoken again when he felt someone rocking the chair from behind him. After jumping up to see who it was, he saw his good friend Captain McPherson standing there in soaking wet clothes and with a half-mutilated face. Colonel Wilson was horrified as he was told by Captain McPherson that he had been murdered, but that he did not want his death to be avenged. Captain McPherson said that this was because he didn’t want “the next generation to hate them as much as this one does.” After that the home was pretty much quiet. At least, that was until 1984 when it was purchased by an architect that was in awe of the beauty of the Greek-style architecture.

Soon after purchasing the home, the architect turned it into a museum. This was the time when more supernatural activity first started being felt. One of the first instances happened when a tour guide was taking a group through the house and one individual asked if the piano in the parlor worked. Not knowing the answer, the guide pressed on one of the keys, showing everyone that the piano did not work. The group continued on with the tour and was just about to leave the area, when the piano began playing all on its own. Apparently, the piano would play for certain entities!

As time went on, more and more disturbances continued to be felt and they became increasingly aggressive and violent. It was said that anyone who walked into the house could immediately feel the oppressive air in the home. This unnerving atmosphere only continued to become worse. One evening the owner was walking through a door when it was slammed behind them even though no one was standing behind it. The owner’s fingers were caught in the doorjamb and he was significantly hurt. The owner has also mentioned on occasion that he was walking through the same parlor that held the piano when he felt someone shove him from behind. He was pushed so fiercely that he fell to his knees.

The owner became so disturbed by the many happenings around the house that he had an exorcism performed. It’s said that ever since that was done, the atmosphere around the home is much calmer and much more peaceful now. But the exorcism didn’t completely void the home of spirits. It’s said that the odd Confederate soldier can be seen walking around from time to time. There’s also a woman who has long brown hair and wears a homespun dress. She seems to reside in the middle room. Captain McPherson has also revisited the home from time to time, although not as often as he once did. Unfortunately, he’s also still bloody and wet and missing half his face.

If you want to check out some authentic spirits from the Civil War, the McRaven House is located at 1445 Harrison Street and they hold daily tours.


The McRaven House

The McRaven House

The McRaven House