The second Shakespeare’s Sonnet ever

SHAKESPEARE'S SECOND SONNET
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What was the Shakespeare’s second sonnet?

In Shakespeare’s Sonnets, or what are often referred to as simply The Sonnets, there seems to be an ongoing story about a young man, who is first urged to marry and then becomes the object of the poet’s affection. The young man then marries and The Sonnets become poems that touch many different topics. The first 17 are known as the procrastination sonnets and this is Sonnet #2:

“When forty winters shall besiege thy brow
And dig deep trenches in thy beauty's field,
Thy youth's proud livery, so gazed on now,
Will be a tottered weed of small worth held:
Then being asked where all thy beauty lies,
Where all the treasure of thy lusty days,
To say within thine own deep-sunken eyes
Were an all-eating shame and thriftless praise.
How much more prasie deserved thy beauty's use
If thou couldst answer, 'This fair child of mine
Shall sum my count and make my old excuse,'
Proving his beauty by succession thine.
This were to be new made when thou art old
And see thy blood warm when thou feel'st cold.”


The second Shakespeare’s Sonnet ever

The second Shakespeare’s Sonnet ever

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