Amelia Earhart


AMELIA EARHART
THE LONGEST LIST OF THE LONGEST STUFF AT THE LONGEST DOMAIN NAME AT LONG LAST

Amelia Earhart

Everyone knows the name Amelia Earhart and for good reason. Known as “Lady of the Air,” she set many records in aviation. In 1928 she was the first woman to fly across the Atlantic as a passenger. In 1932 she was the first woman to take a solo flight across the Atlantic. It’s also worthwhile to note that this solo flight was also only the second ever taken. In 1935, she made history again by being the first person to journey on a solo flight across the Pacific, with the total travel being from Honolulu, Hawaii to Oakland, California. Not only are these records impressive on their own but at a time when there was almost complete male domination, it’s extremely remarkable.

Born in Atchison, Kansas on July 24, 1897 as Amelia Mary Earhart, she was always facing financial difficulties of some sort and filled many small jobs in her eternal search to be able to fly. In order to save enough money to buy her own plane, she was a teacher, a nursing assistant, a photographer, a secretary, and a social worker. She even purchased a truck and spent some time delivering gravel to raise extra funds.

She was known to her friends as AE and she was a very strong and modern woman. She was continually fighting for international peace, women’s rights, a more active role for women in aviation, and the promotion of commercial aviation. Despite her previous records, Amelia Earhart wanted more. She wanted to set the record for being the first person to ever fly around the world at its longest distance – around the equator. The travel distance would be difficult with it being 29,000 miles. Excited about making the record, she knew this would be her last record-breaking attempt. She chose Frederick J. Noonan who was very experienced in the art of navigation, to accompany her on the trip.

After travelling 22,000 miles of the extremely long journey, she left Lae, New Guinea on July 2, 1937 in her silver twin-engine Electra. It would take her eighteen hours to travel the 2,556 miles across the ocean and to land on Howland Island. It would be the most dangerous part of the trip and the U.S. government had stationed supplies on the island to help her in her quest. Along with the supplies, the government had also constructed an airfield to ensure that she could land and take off again safely.

Howland Island is devoid of any people who live there. It’s a very small island located in the North Pacific and measures only one and a half miles long and half a mile wide. Taking even further measures to ensure that she would arrive safely, the United States Coast Guard had place a boat Itasca just off the shore of the island to maintain radio contact with Earhart.

At about the time she was due to land onto the island, Amelia radioed in to the Itasca to report that she believed herself to be flying above the island but she could not see it. She seemed a bit disoriented as to what her location was and she needed help to manoeuvre herself and her plane onto safe land. She spoke into the radio, “We are running north and south,” and it’s believed that she was flying in a search pattern while trying to locate the island. Those would be her last words. Before those aboard the Itasca could locate her, she lost all contact on the radio. Although radio contact continued to try and be made, eventually all contact was lost.

Although some think it’s a mystery what happened to Amelia Earhart, it’s most likely that her plane simply ran out of fuel before she could locate the island and the plane, herself and Frederick J. Noonan were lost at sea. It is interesting however that neither the famous female aviator, her navigator, or the plane have ever been found


Amelia Earhart


Amelia Earhart

Amelia Earhart

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